Walking in Killarney

Our Favourite Walks in Killarney

Dunloe View Killarney is a wonderful base in Beaufort, Killarney for Walkers of all abilities. Walking in this area is a truly magical experience given the stunning natural beauty of the place. There are endless walks and pathways that allow you to walk for hours. In addition, there are walks that suit all levels of fitness and ability. Below are some of our favourite walks to get you started.

Our Favourite Walks in Killarney

Our Favourite Walks in Killarney

Dunloe View Killarney is a wonderful base in Beaufort, Killarney for Walkers of all abilities. Walking in this area is a truly magical experience given the stunning natural beauty of the place. There are endless walks and pathways that allow you to walk for hours. In addition, there are walks that suit all levels of fitness and ability. Below are some of our favourite walks to get you started.

Walk through the Gap of Dunloe

Dunloe View Killarney is a wonderful base in Beaufort, Killarney for Walkers of all abilities. Walking in this area is a truly magical experience given the stunning natural beauty of the place. There are endless walks and pathways that allow you to walk for hours. In addition, there are walks that suit all levels of fitness and ability. Below are some of our favourite walks to get you started.

You can see the Gap of Dunloe from the Apartment Sitting Roomwindow. Walking through this ancient glaciated valley with its five corrie lakes is a highlight you won’t want to miss. So, park at Kate Kearney’s Cottage. You can then choose to either walk through the Gap of Dunloe or to take a pony and carriage. The distance is 11km but you can cut this short at any time. The road is sealed and hiking boots are not required .

Walk through the Gap of Dunloe

Dunloe View Killarney is a wonderful base in Beaufort, Killarney for Walkers of all abilities. Walking in this area is a truly magical experience given the stunning natural beauty of the place. There are endless walks and pathways that allow you to walk for hours. In addition, there are walks that suit all levels of fitness and ability. Below are some of our favourite walks to get you started.

You can see the Gap of Dunloe from the Apartment Sitting Roomwindow. Walking through this ancient glaciated valley with its five corrie lakes is a highlight you won’t want to miss. So, park at Kate Kearney’s Cottage. You can then choose to either walk through the Gap of Dunloe or to take a pony and carriage. The distance is 11km but you can cut this short at any time. The road is sealed and hiking boots are not required .

Tomies Wood Loop Walk

Dunloe View Killarney is a wonderful base in Beaufort, Killarney for Walkers of all abilities. Walking in this area is a truly magical experience given the stunning natural beauty of the place. There are endless walks and pathways that allow you to walk for hours. In addition, there are walks that suit all levels of fitness and ability. Below are some of our favourite walks to get you started.

The starting point for this walk is 7 km from Dunloe View apartment. This circular walk, starts and finishes at the northern end of Tomies Wood on the western side of Lough Leane. This walk brings you through native oak woodlands and conifer plantations and offers fine views of Lough Leane and its islands. Tomies Wood is one of the best areas also to see white-tailed eagles soaring majestically along the slopes of the mountains. It’s also a great area to learn about some of the very interesting flora and fauna of the woodlands. The trail is steeped in Irish Mythology. It is said that Tomies Wood and Mountain were the summer hunting grounds of Fionn Mc Cumhaill and his followers the Fianna. These were legendary warriors . Legend also has it that the cairns of stones on the summit of Tomies Mountain (which overlook Tomies Wood) are the burial siteof this ancient Irish Chieftain. On the loop you will see a sign for O’Sullivan’s Cascade. This is a beautiful waterfall flowing into Lough Leane. Legend has it that the waterfall once flowed not with water but with whiskey. Apparently, It was Fionn McCumhaill’s own personal supply.

Note: We find the steps to O’ Sullivan’s Cascade quite steep and can be slippery in wet weather. Nevertheless, it is well worth the effort. Don’t just go to the waterfall but also spend some time on the shores of Lough Leane when you are down there. The trail is steeped in Irish Mythology. It is said that Tomies Wood and Mountain were the summer hunting grounds of Fionn Mc Cumhaill and his followers the Fianna. These were legendary warriors . Legend also has it that the cairns of stones on the summit of Tomies Mountain (which overlook Tomies Wood) are the burial siteof this ancient Irish Chieftain.
On the loop you will see a sign for O’Sullivan’s Cascade. This is a beautiful waterfall flowing into Lough Leane. Legend has it that the waterfall once flowed not with water but with whiskey. Apparently, It was Fionn McCumhaill’s own personal supply.

The Fossa Way

This circular walk is popular with tourists and locals alike. This is a wonderful way to walk through the National Park and observe some of its wildlife . The trail has a smooth gravel path throughout and is suitable for bicycles, buggies and strollers. On this trail you will experience wonderful mountain and lake views and you will have a very good chance of seeing some Red Deer. Directly across the road from the pub you will see the entrance to the Fossa Way. Walk for about 15/20 minutes until you reach the gates of Killarney Golf Club (opposite Liebherr factory) Now you have a choice. You can go straight on or, what we like to do is take a right and go through the Golf ClubDirectly across the road from the pub you will see the entrance to the Fossa Way.

Walk for about 15/20 minutes until you reach the gates of Killarney Golf Club (opposite Liebherr factory) Now you have a choice. You can go straight on or, what we like to do is take a right and go through the Golf Club.

Killarney Golf Club is located within Killarney National Park. Please stick to the pathways and observe the signs. Walk down towards the Golf Club and near the lakeshore you will see a paved road going to the left. Take this left.

Continue on this path until you eventually arrive at wrought iron gates.

This section of the walk could take up to 30 minutes. At the left hand side of this gate there is a pedestrian walkthrough.

This will bring you through to the grounds of the Castlerosse Hotel . Walk on and follow the path past a cottage and then you will the National Park.

Walk arrive into straight on through the Park and you will finally  come out at the gates opposite the Cathedral in Killarney .  

Walk to Mucross House from Jarvey Carpark entrance

Starting point is located at what is called the Jarvey Entrance to the National Park. Watch out for the following sign.

Park your car here. Enter the park through the wrought iron gates.

You will be stopped in your tracks by a stunning view of Lough Leane framed against the backdrop of the McGillycuddy Reeks.

Walk down the main path and soon Mucross Abbey will come into view on your left hand side.

Diverge off the path and visit the Abbey. Mucross Abbey was founded in the 15th Century by the Franciscans. These well preserved runins include a square courtyard where grows and ancient yew tree. It is though that this tree is as old as the Abbey itself.

The graveyard is the burial place of the great Irish poets Eoghan Rua O’ Suilleabhain, Aoghan O Rathaill and Geoffrey O’ Donoghue. The graveyard is still in use today.

Go back on to the path. And walk straight on until you come to Muckross House. There are lots of walks around Muckross House and Gardens for you to enjoy.

The Old Kenmare Road

Walking the Old Kenmare Road is a magical experience that will take you back in time and back to nature. It is a very special trail within Killarney National Park because of its landscape, flora and fauna and its history. There is wonderful isolation here and also stark beauty sandwiched as it is between Torc and Mangerton Mountain. Until 1820 the Old Kenmare Road was the only road between Killarney and Kenmare . The main road that you use today to travel to Kenmare by car was not constructed until 1860. By this time the townlands along the Old Kenmare Road were emptied of people through a combination of famine and emigration. By the 1860’s the Old Kenmare Road looked exactly as it looks today. Look carefully at the landscape on either side and you will see little fields that were once use to grow potatoes. These are called lazy beds (‘undug’ potato furrows from the famine times which are now covered with grass). Along the route can be seen the remains of famine settlements abandoned in 1840’s. You will also come across an area where the tenants’ houses were broken down to create large stone piles or cairns. These cairns were used as resting places for the muskets used by the landlord at the time (Lord Kenmare) and friends to shoot the deer
As you walk along this rough track, it is hard to believe that horse drawn coaches once travelled along this route especially when you come past Corrs Cascade and reach the magical area known as Esknamucky Glen. In this narrow gully you will come across some writing on a stone slab written by a member of the Irish army in the 1800’s. ‘James Neill Tippy’ may have been stationed here to watch out for smugglers on the route smuggling the likes of butter, whiskey or sheep.

Cardiac Hill

This is a series of several hundred steps that go up the slopes of Torc Mountain. This is a wonderful workout. Believe me, it is not called Cardiac Hill for nothing. You will however also be rewarded with great views of the Lakes of Killarney, McGillycuddy Reeks and Killarney National Park.

Cross the road from the carpark and continue along this trail to the right for about 15/20 mins. Watch out for the steps on your left hand side.

You will have a rope and pole banister to help you after a while. Once the steps are over the trail levels out and you begin to traverse the north face of Torc. You will have amazing views of the Lakes and the National Park on your left.

 Eventually you will reach a junction where you can either take a left which will bring you back to the carpark or if you’re feeling energetic go right to Torc Waterfall.

Ross Island loop walk

Setting off from the Castle you soon see sneak peeks of the beautiful lake and island through the trees and off track forest routes. There are wonderful viewing points like the Copper Mines, Gorvernor’s Rock, Library Point and Innisfallen Island with its 6th Century Monastic ruins..
This is a beautiful walk at any time of the year but it is particularly beautiful during spring when it is carpeted with bluebells and wild garlic and of course during Autumn when the leaves turn russet and gold.

Killarney House & Gardens

This is our Versailles…
This oasis of calm away from the busy streets of Killarney Town is an absolute must visit.
A bit of history…

Killarney House was once know as Kenmare House and was owned by the Earls of Kenmare and built in the 18th Century. In the 1950’s the last Earl of Kenmare died and Kenmare House and all its lands was sold to an American Property Developer called John McShain and his wife Mary. They renamed it Killarney House. Following the death of Mrs McShain in 1998 Killarney House and garden were generously donated to the State and became a welcome addition to Killarney National Park. After extensive repairs and reconstruction Killarney House and Gardens were finally opened to the public in 2016. You can slip into the house and gardens through the Golden Gates. These gates are found opposite the East Avenue Hotel/Methodist Church. Alternatively, you can enter by the sculpture of Monsignor Hugh O’ Flaherty (the scarlet Pimpernel of the Vatican) You will be struck immediately by the beauty and tranquility of this beautiful haven right in the heart of the town. The planted beds and tree lined pathways provide a circuit within which to wander the gardens. In May when the cherry blossoms which flank a long avenue are in bloom the garden really comes into its own and is truly magical. This is a great place in which to wander and explore or simply sit on a bench with a coffee and watch the world go by. People bring their rugs and cooler boxes during the summer and picnic here.

You can also access the National Park from these grounds and walk to Knockreer or Ross Castle. Killarney House and Gardens offer a sanctuary away from the hustle and bustle of life as well as being a portal to the National Park .